Commercial Driver Licensing

Tips

Update your Medical Exam/DOT Physical by email, fax or mail.

You must visit a CDL office for all other commercial license transactions.

Entry-level drivers are subject to new federal training requirements. See Commercial Learner's Permit.

FMCSA Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information & Resources

Truck Driver

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Handbooks and Forms

Medical Exams

  • Ask your employer and see Self-Certification to determine whether you need an exam. Employers may require an exam even if federal or state regulations do not.
  • You must obtain your exam from a provider listed in the National Registry of Certified Medical Examiners.
  • The DMV accepts only the MCSA-5876 Medical Examiner's Certificate (MEC). The long-form medical examination is not accepted.
  • Drivers are responsible for ensuring all information is complete and legible.

Updating your MEC

You may submit your new Medical Exam Certificate by any of the following methods if there are no other changes:

  • Fax to Driver License Assessment Team at (775) 684-4818
  • Scan and email to DLReviewWeb@dmv.nv.gov
  • Mail to:
    Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles
    Driver License Assessment Team
    555 Wright Way
    Carson City, NV 89711

Any other change to your CDL must be completed in person.

Criminal Convictions and DUI Rules

Traffic Violations

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Regulations Part 383.31 requires all commercial drivers to notify their home state and employer of any traffic convictions received in another state. Please complete and return this form to the Department of Motor Vehicles within 30 days following conviction.

Hazmat Disqualification

The federal Transportation Security Administration requires drivers who hold a Hazardous Materials Endorsement to surrender the endorsement if he or she commits a disqualifying offense (49 CFR 1572.5). See Hazmat Disqualifying Offenses.

Driving Under the Influence

According to federal regulation 49 CFR 383.51, upon receipt of a DUI conviction, a Commercial Driver License will be suspended for one full year (three full years if carrying hazardous materials) for a first offense and for life upon a second or subsequent offense.

A commercial license has two parts: a commercial side (CDL) and a non-commercial side (NCDL). When a driver’s NCDL is revoked or suspended, the CDL is also affected. If the driver is convicted of a first DUI offense by the court, the NCDL will be revoked for at least 185 days and the CDL privilege will be suspended for at least one year.

There may be a period of time when the license will be revoked between a DUI arrest and the conviction, if any. This period counts toward the NCDL revocation period of 185 days or longer. If the court convicts the driver of DUI, however, the commercial side of his license must be suspended for at least one full year. The suspension during the interim period does not count toward the full year. .

Legal References